WOODALL MOUNTAIN, MISSISSIPPI (HIGH POINT #30)

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This is the second state high point we have hit on our Easter road trip.  Again I will have my dad write the commentary on our trip today:

We spent the night in Tupelo, Mississippi, and even saw Elvis Presley’s birthplace, home church, and the Hardware store where he bought his first guitar.  Then, it was back onto the Natchez Trace into the extreme northeast corner of the state to Woodall Mountain.  By the time we got there, it was raining.  Thinking back, this is the first time in our 30 state highpoint trips that we had rain (though I do remember some sleet on Mt. Washington in New Hampshire on a July day).  It did not bother us too much, however, as Woodall is essentially a drive-up mountain.  There were a number of communications towers at the summit, pine trees, and a large rock that unfortunately had the sign removed.  We signed the register, and for the second consecutive day we were the second “expedition” of the day to reach the summit.  At 806 feet above sea level, it was certainly higher than Driskill Mountain, but might not qualify as a “mountain” by some standards.  As usual, Mokey tried to get into as many pictures as possible.  For this trip, we hope to bag two more highpoints!

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These were shot with my Nikon D600 with my 24-75mm f/2.8 lens.

 

 

-ZAM

 

 

 

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MISSISSIPPI BLACKSMITH

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Yesterday after our Louisianna hike, we drove our way East to Mississippi.  As soon as we got there, we hopped onto the Natchez Trace Trail, which is a scenic drive that will take you from Natchez, Mississippi all the way up to Nashville, Tennesee.  Along the trail, there were many little towns and attractions to visit. One stop we made was the Mississippi Craft Center. Outside the craft center there was a booth where some blacksmiths were doing metal work. They were really friendly guys and offered to show us some of the work they were doing and the process used to create some of their intricate designs. While we were there, they were in the process of building and forming some big screws. They had a few furnaces as you see in the photos which would be turned up to about 2900 degrees.  They would bury the metal in some of the coals there to make sure that it would heat up to a malleable state.  They would then use some tools to grab the bolt and bring it over to a work horse where they would take a 25-30 lb. hammer to slam it into its final form.  They only had a few seconds to do this before the metal would cool off to a state where it was no longer formable.  Using this process along with some different tools and molds is how they would create some of the pieces you see below. The rest of the craft center was a very modern looking building that housed some very beautiful artwork. It was really neat to look around and a great stop to break up our 5 hour drive up to Tupelo, Mississippi.

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These were shot with my Nikon D600 and 24-75mm f/2.8.

-ZAM

lens rental